And Another Thing…

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It’s over! It’s over! Woo-hoo!

My two cents on the election:

My title is sincere. I have known for the past 10 months that I would be happier about the end of the election than about whoever won it.

Within 50 years of the civil rights movement, we have seen a black man win a presidential election. There is something undeniably wonderful about that.

The next person who whines in my presence about having to wait in line to vote is going to get a punch in the throat. Millions of people around the world live in Third World toilets where any clown with enough men and guns can declare himself “President for Life”. What do you think citizens of such a country would endure to have a vote? How dare any American gripe about minor inconveniences when so many people risk their livelihoods and lives to cast a vote, or don’t get to vote at all?

McCain delivered a classy, humble, and moving concession speech. This is the John McCain that everybody loved in 2000. Where has he been for the past two years? I hope that he will have the opportunity to rehabilitate his image and reputation before he retires.

Is it just me, or did McCain actually look relieved and Obama somewhat solemn? I wonder if Obama is starting to think “What have I gotten myself into?” I sure would if I were him.

Jesse Jackson, that ambulance chaser of American race-relations, was there last night, his eyes red and moist. I wonder if he was crying from joy or because he knows that he could never have had the moment that Obama is having?

Brian Williams is okay, but I didn’t realize what a big hole Tim Russert’s passing left until last night.

If your candidate won: proceed with caution. Don’t put too much trust in any leader.

If your candidate lost: take a breath. The future is not nearly as bad as you expect.

Finally, this article, which aptly expresses how I and many other believers have felt about this election.

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Filed under: Politics, , , , , , ,

14 Responses

  1. Since you posted to my blog, thought I would respond in yours. I always have said that I feel sorry for whomever got the White House, simply because of the cluster(bleep) they are inheriting. He certainly has the weight of the world on his shoulders. Obama doesn’t really even get a honeymoon period.

    I am happy for the black community in this victory. Obama is a great example for African American young men of what is possible in their own lives and how far they can go. On another note, those who say that “the white man is keeping them down” can’t say that any more when one of your own is in the White House. The ACLU may have to find others to represent. I hope that because of this African Americans (especially the young ones) become more involved in the political process. The incoming first family (and their extended family) are the most diverse I think any country has ever had and I personally am proud that we can actually have a real melting pot in our White House.

  2. Jr says:

    I am glad it is over. The Lord has His reasons of placing leaders in positions at certain times. Maybe it’s for good, maybe it’s for bad. Maybe it’s for reward, maybe it’s for punishment. Maybe it’s for a time of trial, maybe a time for peace. Regardless, Christians need to stay focused on our true home and our true King and get the message of the cross out to the country and the world; period.

    Earthly speaking, it is amazing to me, however, of how little we know of the man that will be our president. The press (i.e. journalism) is forever destroyed because of what they have failed to do in uncovering his history and the absolute lapdog-drooling attitude they had with him. He is, by definition, the Manchurian Candidate of the Chicago political machine, and we’ll find out who is pulling the strings in the next 4 years. (unfortunately, if you actually look at his history, I think we all know exactly who is pulling his strings)

    By the way. Obama voters. I’m sure I make less than some of you do – when can I get my check from you? Email me and I’ll send you my address. Thanks!

    Just get ready for a wild ride. Israel/Iran action before January 20th is almost a guarantee. Syria, N Korea, Iran will all try him out after January 20th. Oh joy.
    We’ll get what we asked for. Heck of a time for a political experiment. Grab the popcorn – this should be good.

    I pray that he seeks guidance from the Almighty God through Jesus Christ. He is my president and his authority has been given to him and I need to obey that authority.

    May the Lord’s Will be done.

  3. preacherman says:

    I was so excited to become an influence in changing the history of our nation. I am praying hard for Obama and Joe Biden. I think that it is a wonderful thing to see whites, blacks, hispanics, and other countless races come together as one to elect Obama. I strongly believe this race has effected the racism in America. No more can any race blame their race for failing. Obama proved that any race can become all they hope for and dream. It is also great to see Dr. Martin Luther Kings dream become a reality. I know he is looking down from heaven with Obama’s grandmother and celebrating this victory. May all believers pray and undertand that God is still in control. God is still God. We have a loving God who loves us and cares for us more than we can imagine.

  4. David B says:

    “The press (i.e. journalism) is forever destroyed because of what they have failed to do in uncovering his history and the absolute lapdog-drooling attitude they had with him. He is, by definition, the Manchurian Candidate of the Chicago political machine, and we’ll find out who is pulling the strings in the next 4 years. (unfortunately, if you actually look at his history, I think we all know exactly who is pulling his strings).”

    Um…would you mind letting the rest of us in on your secret?

    See, this is the great problem I have with the way the ‘conservatives’ (a term that no longer fits, in that modern conservatives really only care about conserving power and little else) have run this campaign. Throw out an open-ended charge (‘Just what is the sinister relationship between Barack Hussein Obama and domestic terrorist William Ayers? Tell us!’), blame the liberal media elite for not doing a Woodward & Bernstein and verifying their imaginary wish (‘Why, everbody KNOWS that he’s dirty, even though we have no evidence. There’s just GOTTA be something there.’), and then play the victim when a majority of the electorate no longer buys it (‘Only WE are the Real Americans…everybody else has been hoodwinked.’)

    Oh well, Rush Limbaugh, Sean Hannity, & their ilk will have a renewed purpose of re-stoking anger in the far right for the next few years. If this is the ‘good’ that the Right is seeking the next four years, then they won’t have learned a thing from this election.

  5. kes says:

    Observation: I find it curious that this election had nothing to do with race (right?) – yet all that is discussed today in the news (even on this blog and in the comments) is the fact that Obama is black.

    Dirty secret: That’s all this election was ever about; electing a black man.

    Has race relations has been set back 40 years? MLK wanted his children judged (elected?) by the content of their character and not by the color of their skin. This election seems to be just the opposite. Obama won because he is black.

    Can you honestly tell yourself that a white man with no experience, connections to domestic terrorists, who surrounded himself with Marxists throughout his entire life and career (unapologetically), would defeat a well-respected decorated war hero in a presidential election? Really?

    Not a chance. He wouldn’t even have made it out of the party primaries; and everyone reading this knows it.

    We want a real discussion about race? Start here. We elected a man to the highest office in the land solely because of the color of his skin to assuage decades of guilt of horrendous sins.

    Should we find that sad? Or was this a necessary step regardless of motive?

    Or am I completely wrong and he was actually elected because of his socialist policies and that’s what the majority of people want?

  6. andy says:

    Odgie, thanks for the sober view. Your comments for the most part sum up my thoughts (though that link doesn’t)

    I tend to agree with David B. somewhat. If Obama and the democrats are guilty of promoting a candidate with primarily vague ideas and images, then Republicans are guilty of attacking the candidate by the same methods.

  7. Jr says:

    Ya, I knew I shouldn’t have written any opinion that didn’t tote the line for the day. Good thing visceral personal attacks and generalizations (from a preacher no less) rub off fairly easily. Sorry, Odgie, for bringing this to your blog. No more from me.

  8. David B says:

    No really, Jr…I really want to know who you think is pulling Obama’s strings?

  9. odgie says:

    I have said before that part of the problem with working night shifts and keeping a blog is that I am often sleeping while the rest of the blogosphere is commenting away. The result is that sometimes I come back to my blog at night and find a pretty vehement conversation taking place.

    I hadn’t planned on putting my cards on the table like this, but I voted for Barr. I was geared up to vote for McCain until he selected Palin as his running mate. I would agree with those who believe that she has been unfairly treated by the media. I don’t believe for a second that she is the idiot that she has been made out to be. And I have written at length of my respect for her for bringing her son to term after learning that he had Down Syndrome. But I still don’t think that she is ready to be vice-president, especially to a 72 year old president who has a history of cancer. She may become that person, but she is not there yet.

    I was considering voting for Obama at one point, until I reconsidered his position on abortion. Usually I put little stock in whether a president is pro-life or pro-choice as historically that has no effect to speak of on the number of abortions taking place in this country. But Obama has talked out both sides of his mouth on this issue. I agree with him that changing external conditions will help to lower the number of abortions more so than banning the practice. Yet he has promised that his first act as president will be to sign the Freedom of Choice Act, which I cannot help but believe will facilitate more abortions. Furthermore, he refers to unwanted children as “punishment.” That is Kool-Aid that I cannot drink.

    As to Obama’s alleged socialism, I don’t think that the majority of people who voted for him view his policies as such. Folks are scared; nobody wants to see decades of their labor washed out due to exported jobs and collapsing banks. The middle class is shrinking and working people are feeling the squeeze. And tax cuts for the rich in such an economic environment are perhaps the ultimate insult to injury. Obama spoke to these fears, shrewdly I might add.

    Was this election about race? I am sure that for many on both sides it was. But I still feel joy that a member of a race who entered this country as slaves and once lived as second-class citizens can now be elected to the highest office in the federal government. This alone will not purge the sins of the past, but it certainly helps. And it does put paid to the notion that minorities can’t rise above their circumstances.

    Finally, I think that Obama reaped the rewards of being from the party opposite of an extremely unpopular president. Fair or no (and I do think that it is unfair) McCain could not shake the notion that a vote for him = a 3rd Bush term. So it goes.

    Jr, thanks for participating and I hope that you will return, if not on this thread then on another. Dave, Andy, Preach, and Milena; thanks for kicking in.

  10. preacherman says:

    Odgie,
    I love your blog.
    It is one my favorites.
    You do a fantastic job.
    I believe if we are honest with ourselves we will understand that taxes redistributes wealth. That is what taxes do. It is there purpose. It keeps everything in check and the economy going. I don’t think Obama is a socialist. I strongly believe that we will see that he will be as great of a president as JFK. Just my thoughts. Keep up the great work you do with this blog and the discussion you have. I have been encouraged and challenged. Thank you! 🙂

  11. Lou says:

    “Finally, I think that Obama reaped the rewards of being from the party opposite of an extremely unpopular president. Fair or no (and I do think that it is unfair) McCain could not shake the notion that a vote for him = a 3rd Bush term. So it goes.”

    I think you hit the nail on the head with that, Odgie. If the Republicans could have brought Reagan back from the dead, he would not have won this election. The fact that it was as close as it was shows the tentativeness of Americans to get behind Obama.

    I really enjoyed reading your thoughts during the election, because it’s obvious your not carrying a party agenda. Most of us can’t say that. I, like you, am very happy that it’s over. For any who are unhappy with the outcome, I will remind you of the words of Abraham Lincoln, “While the people retain their virtue and vigilence, no administration, by any extreme of wickedness or folly, can very seriously injure the government in the short space of four years.”

    (These are not the words of Lincoln.)
    “I strongly believe that we will see that he will be as great of a president as JFK. ”

    JFK is viewed as a great President because of the events in Dallas. He brought us very close to a nuclear war by his mishandling of the Cuban missle crisis. He wasn’t a horrible President, but he definitely wasn’t in the top 10. I hope Obama does much better.

    One other thing, as for the Ayers, Wright, Khalidi stuff: there are some of us out here who actually think that is a relevant issue. It concerns me quite a bit that our President-elect seems to have a habit of valuing the opinions of people whose views are beyond radical. Moreover, the only time any of those people are denounced is when the issue is forced. For any of us who attend church, we know that people leave for much smaller reasons than hearing things like Wright says. After hearing over and over again the problems of listening to Karl Rove or James Dobson, I have a hard time believing that Ayers and Wright are not 10 times worse in the opposite direction. I know people like to remind us that Jesus hung around with some bad folks, but Paul also wrote that “evil companionship corrupts good morals”.

  12. Stacey says:

    “I believe if we are honest with ourselves we will understand that taxes redistributes wealth. That is what taxes do. It is there purpose. It keeps everything in check and the economy going.”

    Preacherman, I very strongly disagree. If we are honest with ourselves and with what God wants from us, Christians are responsible for redistributing wealth. It is not the job of our government to do that. Currently, taxes fund programs that don’t work. For example, our government provides housing at a very low rental rate for those who don’t have the money to afford a place to live, and while I agree that the idea is great in theory, it isn’t helping individuals better themselves. I audited housing for several years and time and time again saw individuals who wanted desperately to improve their situations but were stuck because if they made more money, their rent would go up, and yet the increase in income would not cover the higher rent & utility costs. Therefore, it was more beneficial for these individuals not to work and live in public housing for years and years on end (and as a result, teaching the next generation to do the same).

    Also, if you look at the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, so many lost so much and needed so much. The government couldn’t get things done effectively, yet the churches did. Churches provided places for people to stay, food, water, supplies and people to help families rebuild their houses. THAT is the best system that exists to help the less fortunate, not taxes. It is God-ordained and God commanded.

    Now, that doesn’t mean that taxes aren’t necessary. I do think we need to pay taxes to take care of the “business” of the United States. We need money to fund our government, military, etc. However, taking care of the poor isn’t the business of the government; it is the business of the church. Is this an idealistic way to view this topic? Probably. However, I believe that great things can be accomplished through Christians. 🙂

  13. Roland says:

    A Black man won? Where? Who?

  14. […] have already explained why [Comment 9] I put little stock in any presidential candidate’s stand on abortion ~ I have yet […]

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